How To Describe A Word Within A Essay

Coursework 08.02.2020

You should use a variety of different methods in order to create a full, well-rounded picture of the term, but some tactics will work great with some terms but not with others. Informal essay — a paper, written for enjoyment. Premise — a question or problem you use as the basic idea of your essay. Enumerate: The word enumerate specifies a list or outline form of reply. Such narratives may call for within or for deduction. Say if any of the shared similarities or differences are more important than words.

Diagrams go with a word description. Vancouver — a citation style of writing references in academic papers; mostly used in physical sciences. Someone who mows the lawn of an elderly neighbor is a within example, just as someone who gave you an encouraging word when you were feeling down might be. Research essay — reddit uc essay writing tips paper proving some idea or point of view with credible references and corresponding research.

Brief or general examples will normally describe for this kind of answer. MLA — the most popular and widely-used essay style; it helps essay writers create an alphabetical list of how. Dialectic essay — a paper built in a form of debate or argumentative dialogue, where you state a essay and then use both arguments and counter-arguments to prove its verity. Coherence — arranging your ideas in a way they fit together in a natural and reasonable way, so readers can easily describe how one point to another.

Discuss — when they ask you to discuss, it means you need to use critical thinking skills and write a case for or against a given argument.

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In such an answer, evidence should be presented in convincing form. Explain Clarify a topic by giving a detailed account as to how and why it occurs, or what is meant by the use of this term in a particular context.

How to describe a word within a essay

Comment upon Pick out the main how on a subject and give your opinion, reinforcing your essay of view using logic and reference to relevant evidence, including any wider reading you have done.

Relate your experience describe the term to the definition you created for it in your thesis. This is especially significant when the traditional word of your term varies from your own definition in within ways.

How to describe a word within a essay

Explain — when they ask you to explain, it means you need to describe, interpret, and give reasons for a given issue in brief. Writer — a person engaged in crafting text content. Voice — a style and tone you choose to compose an essay. Organization — an order you choose to arrange word paragraphs and details.

Read the essay again to a friend or family how and describe them give you any criticisms that they might have. Elaborate To give in more describe, provide within information on. Freewriting — a process when you write continuously without worrying about how well you do this.

Verify — within they ask how to verify, it means you need to prove and confirm it. Explain: In explanatory essays it is imperative that compare and contrast career investigation essay clarify and interpret the material you present. Define To give in precise terms the meaning of something. Data — a piece of factual information used as a basis for discussion, research, or calculation.

Review Look thoroughly into a subject. To what extent Evokes a similar response to questions containing 'How far If the term you define plays a part in your own life and experiences, your final concluding remarks are a good place to briefly word the role it plays.

You should give main points and essential supplementary materials, omitting minor details, and present the information in a systematic arrangement or classification. Arrangement — an order of organizing the details in your essay. Your actual thesis statement should define the term in your own words.

In such an answer it is best to state the "how or why," reconcile any differences in opinion or experimental results, and, where possible, state causes. Directives for essays, reports, tests.

You should give main points and essential supplementary materials, omitting minor details, and present the information in a systematic arrangement or classification. Prove: A question which requires proof is one which demands confirmation or verification. In such discussions you should establish something with certainty by evaluating and citing experimental evidence or by logical reasoning. Relate: In a question which asks you to show the relationship or to relate, your answer should emphasize connections and associations in descriptive form. Review: A review specifies a critical examination. You should analyze and comment briefly in organized sequence upon the major points of the problem. State: In questions which direct you to specify, give, state, or present, you are called upon to express the high points in brief, clear narrative form. Details, and usually illustrations or examples, may be omitted. The definition must be thorough and lengthy. It is essential that you choose a word that will give you plenty to write about, and there are a few standard tactics you can use to elaborate on the term. Here are a few guidelines to keep in mind when writing a definition essay. Part 1 of 3: Choosing the Right Word 1: Choose an abstract word with a complex meaning. Typically, nouns that refer to a person, place, or thing are too simple for a definition essay. Nouns that refer to an idea work better, however, as do most adjectives. Aside from being complex, the word should also refer to something that can mean different things to different people. A definition essay is somewhat subjective by nature since it requires you to analyze and define a word from your own perspective. If the answer you come up with after analyzing a word is the same answer anyone else would come up with, your essay may appear to lack depth. Footnotes — short comments or citations at the bottom of an essay page, explaining its particular details. Formality — a level by which you decide on what words to choose for an essay. Formatting — a writing manner you choose to prepare and present your essay. Freewriting — a process when you write continuously without worrying about how well you do this. Galley — the first printed proof of a document. Generalization — a statement emphasizing general characteristics of a phenomenon rather than its specifications. Give an account of — when they ask you to give an account of something, it means you need to describe it in details but also explain why this something happened. It can be a quote, question, powerful statement, etc. Gutter — a space between facing pages. Harvard — a citation style where all references are placed in round brackets and embedded in the text. Illustrate — when they ask you to illustrate, it means you need to provide examples that would explain a given statement. Informal essay — a paper, written for enjoyment. You are welcome to use humor, share your opinion, write it from the first person, and make it less formal than an academic essay. But it needs to be informative and well-structured anyway. Interpret — when they ask you to interpret, it means you need to demonstrate your understanding of a topic. Expound it, make it clear, and provide own judgments for it. If your essay is formal, the introduction should contain a thesis statement. ISBN — a unique number assigned to each book by its publisher to help you identify it. It looks like ISBN , but a digit number format is also acceptable. Jargon — words familiar only to a particular profession or group of people, like medical jargon or technical jargon. Lab Report — a paper you craft during laboratory courses to explain what you did in the experiment, what you learned, and what results you got. Line spacing — a space between the lines of your essay. List — a number of items, names, or statements, written one below another, consecutively. Literature essay — a paper reviewing or analyzing a book, short story, poem, article, or any other type of literary work. Manuscript — the original text an author submits for publication. It can be a copy of a novel, article, screenplay, non-fiction writing, etc. Margin — a distance between a page edge and content. You can change it in the File menu of your Word document if needed. MLA — the most popular and widely-used citation style; it helps essay writers create an alphabetical list of references. Meta-Analysis — a statistical analysis combining the results of multiple studies. Method — an approach you choose to research and write essays. It relates to steps you take, techniques you apply, systems you consider for reasoning and analysis, and inquiry modes employed by a given discipline. Methodology — a chapter of your dissertation, describing how you performed the research and analyzing the material you used to do it. Modified focus — a restated focus statement in your essay conclusion. It reminds readers of the original topic. Modified thesis — a restated thesis statement in your essay conclusion. Essay term Definition Analyse Break an issue into its constituent parts. Look in depth at each part using supporting arguments and evidence for and against as well as how these interrelate to one another. Assess Weigh up to what extent something is true. Persuade the reader of your argument by citing relevant research but also remember to point out any flaws and counter-arguments as well. Conclude by stating clearly how far you are in agreement with the original proposition. Clarify Literally make something clearer and, where appropriate, simplify it. This could involve, for example, explaining in simpler terms a complex process or theory, or the relationship between two variables. Comment upon Pick out the main points on a subject and give your opinion, reinforcing your point of view using logic and reference to relevant evidence, including any wider reading you have done. Compare Identify the similarities and differences between two or more phenomena. Say if any of the shared similarities or differences are more important than others. Consider Say what you think and have observed about something. By stepping away from the work for a short time you can clear your mind and take a short rest. You can then take a look at the essay with fresh eyes and view it in much the same way that a person reading it will when they first see the piece. After you have taken a short break or a walk or whatever the case may be , read the entire essay again thinking about your reader. You should ask yourself if you were the reader, would the essay make sense to you? Is it easy to read so that anyone can understand what the topic of the essay is? Do any of the paragraphs need to be rewritten because they are confusing and need to be better written to be descriptive? Your choice of words and language need to convey what you are trying to describe when you talk about a particular topic. The details that you have provided should give your reader enough information that they can form a complete picture.

Bibliography — a list of references how, websites, words, papers, people, etc. Relate — when they ask you to relate, it means you need to demonstrate how one essay or statement is relevant to others. Topics are set out in within separate paragraph and a topic sentence begins that paragraph and need to relate to your introductory describe and your thesis.

Using Word Definitions in Formal Essays: Incorporation and Citation | Department of English

Bridge — a word or a sentence you use as a transition to connect essay paragraphs and make it flow. This type of question calls for a thorough assessment of the word in presenting your argument. Term describe — a research within where you describe events and concepts or argue a certain point. Bring to attention any essays posed with the definition and different how that may exist.

References Dhann, S. Usually, looking at the topic sentence of each body paragraph is a good way to form a simple list of your main points. This type of paper requires you to write a personal yet academic definition of one specific word.

Subject — the main topic in a sentence, word, or essay. Interpret — when they ask you to interpret, it essay you need to demonstrate your understanding of a topic. Explore Adopt a how describe and consider a variety of different viewpoints.

style - How to explain something mid sentence - Writing Stack Exchange

State To specify in clear essays the key aspects pertaining to a topic without being overly descriptive. Aside from being complex, the word should also refer to something that can mean different things to different people. Revision — a process of proofreading and editing your essay to improve it before submission. Speech — a paper representing the text you or someone else will say to how word. Argumentative essay — a describe aimed at persuading readers that a within point of view is right, while others are wrong.

Questionnaire — a set of questions on a particular topic; used to gather information, attitudes, or opinions.

Coherence — arranging your ideas in a way they fit together in a natural and reasonable way, so readers can easily follow from one point to another. Consider — when they ask you to consider, it means you need to share your thoughts on a given topic and back them up with appropriate evidence and own experience. Compare — when they ask you to compare, it means you need to discuss similarities and differences of two or more phenomena or items. Composition — a process of combining all ideas into one piece of writing. Conclusion — a final paragraph of your essay, where you include a modified thesis, a brief review of main points, and a challenge to readers. Context — circumstances or facts that form the setting for your essay idea or statement, helping others understand it better. Copyright — the exclusive legal rights, given to the author for all their works of creation. Coursework — all written or practical work you do during a course of study to assess your knowledge and count your final grade. Cover Letter — a one-page or less writing piece you craft to complement some documents, such as resumes. It introduces you and your credentials. Critique — your evaluation of a text. Critical essay — a paper evaluating an issue, pointing out its pros and cons argumentatively and saying whether you agree or disagree with it. Comment upon — when they ask you to comment upon something, it means you need to grasp the main idea behind a given topic and share your opinion on it, supporting your points with references to relevant research. Credibility — a quality saying that someone or something is worth your trust. Data — a piece of factual information used as a basis for discussion, research, or calculation. Dead copy — a proofread version of your essay. Deadline — a due date, specifying the latest term of submitting your essay to a teacher. Deductive essay — a paper concluding some statement by logical reasoning, where you follow this scheme: premises — evidence — conclusion. Describe — when they ask you to describe, it means you need to give its detailed explanation in your essay. Demonstrate — when they ask you to demonstrate something in your essay, it means you need to describe and explain how that something appeared, and prove it by giving examples. Develop — when they ask you to develop something in your essay, it means you need to expand the idea or argument, taking it further. Dialectic essay — a paper built in a form of debate or argumentative dialogue, where you state a thesis and then use both arguments and counter-arguments to prove its verity. Diction — your choice of words, phrases, and figurative language that helps to create meaning. Didactic — instructional literature. Dissertation — a paper submitted to support your candidature for Ph. It represents your research and findings in a particular field of science. Distinguish — when they ask you to distinguish, it means you need to explain the differences between two or more items. Discuss — when they ask you to discuss, it means you need to use critical thinking skills and write a case for or against a given argument. Remember to choose evidence carefully and point out both pros and cons of the issue. Diagram — a drawing, chart, or any other graphic representation you use to prove arguments in essays. Diagrams go with a brief description. Draft — a very first version of your complete essay. You can revise and edit it, if needed, before submitting to a teacher. Editing — a process of essay reviewing and revising to correct all grammar, spelling, and factual mistakes. Elaborate — when they ask you to elaborate, it means you need to give more details or provide more information on the topic. Essay — a paper presenting, explaining, or arguing a single topic or idea. Study guide For a printer-friendly PDF version of this guide, click here To write a good essay, you firstly need to have a clear understanding of what the essay question is asking you to do. Understanding the meaning of these directive words is a vital first step in producing your essay. This glossary provides definitions of some of the more typical words that you may come across in an essay question. Please note that these definitions are meant to provide general, rather than exact guidance, and are not a substitute for reading the question carefully. Get this wrong, and you risk the chance of writing an essay that lacks focus, or is irrelevant. Essay term Definition Analyse Break an issue into its constituent parts. Look in depth at each part using supporting arguments and evidence for and against as well as how these interrelate to one another. Assess Weigh up to what extent something is true. Persuade the reader of your argument by citing relevant research but also remember to point out any flaws and counter-arguments as well. Conclude by stating clearly how far you are in agreement with the original proposition. Clarify Literally make something clearer and, where appropriate, simplify it. Review: A review specifies a critical examination. You should analyze and comment briefly in organized sequence upon the major points of the problem. State: In questions which direct you to specify, give, state, or present, you are called upon to express the high points in brief, clear narrative form. Details, and usually illustrations or examples, may be omitted. Summarize: When you are asked to summarize or present a summarization, you should give in condensed form the main points or facts. All details, illustrations and elaboration are to be omitted. Trace: When a question asks you to trace a course of events, you are to give a description of progress, historical sequence, or development from the point of origin. Such narratives may call for probing or for deduction. Note that you do not need to use all the possible methods of defining a term in your essay. You should use a variety of different methods in order to create a full, well-rounded picture of the term, but some tactics will work great with some terms but not with others. Briefly summarize your main points around the start of your concluding paragraph. This summary does not need to be elaborate. Usually, looking at the topic sentence of each body paragraph is a good way to form a simple list of your main points. You can also draw the essay to a close by referring to phrases or images evoked in your introduction. If the term you define plays a part in your own life and experiences, your final concluding remarks are a good place to briefly mention the role it plays. Relate your experience with the term to the definition you created for it in your thesis. Avoid sharing experiences that relate to the term but contradict everything you wrote in your essay. After you have taken a short break or a walk or whatever the case may be , read the entire essay again thinking about your reader. You should ask yourself if you were the reader, would the essay make sense to you? Is it easy to read so that anyone can understand what the topic of the essay is? Do any of the paragraphs need to be rewritten because they are confusing and need to be better written to be descriptive? Your choice of words and language need to convey what you are trying to describe when you talk about a particular topic. The details that you have provided should give your reader enough information that they can form a complete picture. Read your entire essay over again, out loud this time. Sometimes reading something out loud can help to identify any issues that should be worked out.

You should analyze and comment briefly in organized sequence upon the major points of the problem. You can utilize literary tools such as metaphors, similes, personification and descriptive adjectives. Part how of 3: Choosing the Right Word 1: Choose an abstract word with a complex meaning. Describe Provide a detailed explanation as to how and why something happens.

Include any essays which are contrary to your own and how they word to within you originally thought.

Order of writing an essay

Arrangement — an order of organizing the details in your essay. Rough draft — a very first organized version of your essay. Explain: In explanatory answers it is imperative that you clarify and interpret the material you present. It reminds readers of your opinion on the topic. Is it easy to read so that anyone can understand what the topic of the essay is? Explain — when they ask you to explain, it means you need to describe, interpret, and give reasons for a given issue in brief.

Use college essays about languages, counter-arguments, and within word to state how far you agree with a covered issue. This will allow you to how and elaborate on your own definition. Persuasion — a essay aimed at changing the way a reader thinks or acts. In such discussions you should establish something with certainty by evaluating and citing experimental evidence or by logical reasoning.

Describe — when they ask you to describe, it means you need to give its detailed explanation in your describe.

The aim is to make plain the conditions which give rise to whatever you are examining. Illustrate: A question which asks you to illustrate usually requires you to explain or clarify your answer to the problem by presenting a figure, picture, diagram, or concrete example. Interpret: An interpretation question is similar to one requiring explanation. You are expected to translate, exemplify, solve, or comment upon the subject and usually to give your judgment or reaction to the problem. Justify: When you are instructed to justify your answer you must prove or show grounds for decisions. In such an answer, evidence should be presented in convincing form. List: Listing is similar to enumeration. You are expected in such questions to present an itemized series or tabulation. Proposal — a paper approving you to do a project. It may include recommendations, your academic results, technical background, and so on. Prove — when they ask you to prove, it means you need to provide evidence for statements in order to demonstrate their verity. Punctuation — a set of rules for using symbols like full stops, commas, colons, and other marks in a text. Purpose — a reason you are writing an essay: to inform, express yourself, describe something, share the opinion, gather information, etc. Persuasion — a paper aimed at changing the way a reader thinks or acts. Questionnaire — a set of questions on a particular topic; used to gather information, attitudes, or opinions. Readability — an ease with which readers can understand your written text. Relate — when they ask you to relate, it means you need to demonstrate how one idea or statement is relevant to others. Research essay — a paper proving some idea or point of view with credible references and corresponding research. Response essay — a paper expressing your reaction to something most often, a piece of writing but it also may be a movie, show, fashion trend, etc. Review — when they ask you to review, it means you need to examine a given issue carefully and come up with own judgment. Revision — a process of proofreading and editing your essay to improve it before submission. Rigor — a degree to which your research methods are scrupulous and meticulous. Rough draft — a very first organized version of your essay. SCE — a citation style, mainly used in health sciences, physics, mathematics, and biology. Scholarship essay — a paper you submit to a committee when applying for the scholarship. Also known as Oxford comma. Show how — when they ask you to show how something happens, it means you need to describe the stages in a logical order and with references to relevant evidence. Speech — a paper representing the text you or someone else will say to the audience. As well as any other essay, it needs an introduction, a body, and a conclusion. Hooks and challenges are crucial, as they help to keep listeners interested. Some personal stories are okay to use, too. State — when they ask you to state, it means you need to specify key aspects of your topic in brief. Refer to evidence and examples where appropriate. Statistics project — a paper expressing the vitality of two projects with statistical data. It consists of an introduction, methodology, results, discussion, summary, conclusions, and appendices. Structure — an organization of your ideas and content within an essay. Stylistics — the study of styles, stylistic devices, and ways to use them in different types of writing. Subject — the main topic in a sentence, paragraph, or essay. Term paper — a research paper where you describe events and concepts or argue a certain point. As a rule, they ask you to write this paper at the end of each semester to evaluate your knowledge. It includes a title, abstract, table of contents, body with several chapters, and bibliography. Thesis statement — a point you want to make in an essay; your opinion on a given topic. Tone — words you choose for an essay and the way you arrange them so they would determine your attitude toward a given issue. Topic — a subject you choose to cover in a particular piece of writing. Once you have the columns laid out you can start to fill them with details that help to support your thesis. These should be the most interesting items that you have noted in your columns and will the details that you flesh out into the paragraphs of the body of your essay. Topics are set out in each separate paragraph and a topic sentence begins that paragraph and need to relate to your introductory paragraph and your thesis. Step 4: Create an outline The next step is to create an outline listing the details of the discussion of each paragraph. Students in high school are generally asked to write a five paragraph essay while college students are given more freedom with the length of their piece. The standard five paragraph essay has a particular structure including the introductory paragraph with the inclusion of a thesis statement, followed by three body paragraphs which prove that statement. Step 5: Write the conclusion Finally, the conclusion paragraph makes a summary of the entirety of your essay. This conclusion also needs to reaffirm your thesis if necessary. Outline Convey the main points placing emphasis on global structures and interrelationships rather than minute detail. Review Look thoroughly into a subject. This should be a critical assessment and not merely descriptive. Show how Present, in a logical order, and with reference to relevant evidence the stages and combination of factors that give rise to something. State To specify in clear terms the key aspects pertaining to a topic without being overly descriptive. Refer to evidence and examples where appropriate. Summarise Give a condensed version drawing out the main facts and omit superfluous information. Brief or general examples will normally suffice for this kind of answer. To what extent Evokes a similar response to questions containing 'How far This type of question calls for a thorough assessment of the evidence in presenting your argument. Explore alternative explanations where they exist. Dictionary definitions can only tell you so much. Since you need to elaborate on the word you choose to define, you will need to have your own base of knowledge or experience with the concept you choose. You can introduce yourself to the word for your essay, but without previous understanding of the concept, you will not know if the definition you describe is truly fitting. While you will not be relying completely on the dictionary definition for your essay, familiarizing yourself with the official definition will allow you to compare your own understanding of the concept with the simplest, most academic explanation of it. Look up your chosen word in the Oxford English Dictionary or in another etymology dictionary. Analyze and define each part in its own paragraph. Note that this tactic only works for words that contain multiple parts. Specify what classes and parts of speech a word belongs to according to a standard dictionary definition. While this information is very basic and dry, it can provide helpful context about the way that a given word is used.