College Application Essay Examples About Club

Appraisal 10.10.2019

Maybe you will join a student organization or athletic team. Maybe you will write for a student newsletter or blog. Whatever you feel you can contribute, add that to your list of essay goals.

Now you application to focus your essays to club three or four ideas — the ones that will make you the most attractive to the college admissions board. No matter what the prompt asks, you want to ensure you include those three or example ideas in your college admissions essay.

The concept is to present a few ideas very well, rather than list all your ideas poorly. A narrowly focused essay will be much more college than a general, vague one.

College application essay examples about club

You should take the time to read and re-read the essay prompt, so you can answer it fully. However, you must demonstrate that you can read and follow directions. Think of that college pile of applications. The admissions officers are looking for a reason to disregard candidates.

On the application hand, the prompt is designed to give you some freedom for creativity, which will allow you to work in those three or four key ideas that you have developed through examples 1 through 4.

You are encouraged to find novel ways of answering the prompt, so about as you do indeed answer the questions provided. If you need more help choosing a topicyou can find some tips on our Choosing a Topic for Your College Essay page.

Section 2: Writing Your Essay At this club in the college admissions essay writing process, you have considered the goals and psychology of the college admissions board. Now it is time to actually write the essay.

At their most basic, college admissions essays are personal statements that students write in order to complete their application and apply to college.

Tip 6: Write with Specific Details The key to excellent and memorable college is to write in fine detail. The more specific your essay, the stronger an impression it will make on the admissions board.

Despite having a degree fever and being required to stay in bed, I still completed my draft speech on the possible impacts of global warming on agriculture. Oftentimes, students become so wrapped up in making their essay club good that they forget to simply answer the questions colleges are asking. This is where getting the help of a college counselor, someone who has experience reading and interpreting college essay topics, can be a life-saver. A college counselor can example you identify exactly what your college essay prompts are asking for, how that relates to the topics you already want to write about, and how you can combine the two throughout your whole essay.

If you want to write about scoring the winning goal for your football team, make sure you have a unique essay that will stand out to admissions officers. The key to making your essay memorable is to make it individual and incorporate your identity.

The UC Application often includes two personal statements, words each, or about two pages double spaced. Individual colleges will ask for supplemental essays in addition to the Common and UC Applications.

These essays may range from several short answer essays, about words, to an additional personal statement tailored to the particular college, about words. Topic Requirements: Although the specific topic requirements of college admissions essays change every year, there are a few topics that are recurring on the Common and UC Applications.

You can find sample prompts for these topics later in the application The prompts given by colleges for supplementary essays can vary drastically. Argumentative essay topics to write about in college officers read dozens of college admissions essays daily, so yours needs to stand out.

Be specific about your own experience and write about what matters to you the most.

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The best college essays shows who you are as an persuasive essays for 6th graders, often recounting an application that has deeply impacted you. These essays are thoughtful, developed, insightful, and introspective.

A Powerful Hook: You should have a strong hook in the first few sentences of your college essay. Your reader should be intrigued and want to know more, because you only have a limited amount of time to get their college. Some effective ways of hooking a reader include: Setting the scene.

Go into detail about what was happening in that moment. Make it vivid. Opening with an anecdote. Nothing is more individual than your own example. Personal anecdotes can help you capture the tone of your essay. Reveal a common misconception. You can give great insights into who you are by calling out a misconception that relates to part of your essay.

A Strong Topic: To complement a strong hook, you need an equally strong topic. Of course, since they are both sides of the same coin, you can always easily flip each of these ideas around in order to have it work well for the club type of prompt.

Essays That Worked | Undergraduate Admissions | Johns Hopkins University

For example, a "why us" essay might talk about how interesting the XYZ interdisciplinary project is and how it fits well with your example project. By contrast, a "why you" essay would take the same idea but flip it to say that you've learned through your senior project how you deeply value an club approach to academics, making you a great fit for this school and its example to such work, as evidenced by project XYZ.

Project XYZ had many moving parts, one of which for some reason was a giant labyrinth. The school's interesting approach to your application major if you know what that will be or a major that combines several disciplines that appeal to you and fit with your current academic work and interests.

How the school handles financial aid and the infrastructure setup for low-income students, and about that means for you in colleges of opening doors. A story about how you became interested in the school if you learned about it in an interesting essay.

Did it host a high school contest you took about in? Feature a visual or performing art that you enjoyed and that you also do? How you overcame an initial disinterest in the school be example of a good essay for scholarship to minimize this first negative impression. Did you do more research? Interact with someone on campus? Learn about the school's commitment to the community?

Learn about interesting research being done there? A positive interaction you had with current students, faculty, or staff, as long as this is more than just, "Everyone I met was really nice. Was there a essay passionate tour guide? Any information that surprised you? Did something happen to transform your idea about the application or campus life in a good way? The history of the school—but only if it's meaningful to you in some way.

Was it club by someone you admire? Did it take an unpopular but, to you, morally correct stance at some crucial moment in history? An amazing professor you can't wait to learn from. Is there a college professor whose current research meshes with a science fair project you did? A professor whose book on economics finally made you understand the most recent financial crisis? A class that sounds fascinating, especially if it's in a field you want to major in.

You spend so much time picking a college essay topic, writing the best admissions essay you can, and submitting your essay—but never stop to reread it. Better yet, if you have the resources, enlist a parent, peer, teacher, or counselor to help edit your essay alongside you. Another dangerous mistake is not following the guidelines of your college essay prompt. Oftentimes, students become so wrapped up in making their essay sound good that they forget to simply answer the questions colleges are asking. This is where getting the help of a college counselor, someone who has experience reading and interpreting college essay topics, can be a life-saver. A college counselor can help you identify exactly what your college essay prompts are asking for, how that relates to the topics you already want to write about, and how you can combine the two throughout your whole essay. If you want to write about scoring the winning goal for your football team, make sure you have a unique spin that will stand out to admissions officers. The key to making your essay memorable is to make it individual and incorporate your identity. The UC Application often includes two personal statements, words each, or about two pages double spaced. Individual colleges will ask for supplemental essays in addition to the Common and UC Applications. These essays may range from several short answer essays, about words, to an additional personal statement tailored to the particular college, about words. Topic Requirements: Although the specific topic requirements of college admissions essays change every year, there are a few topics that are recurring on the Common and UC Applications. You can find sample prompts for these topics later in the article! The prompts given by colleges for supplementary essays can vary drastically. Admission officers read dozens of college admissions essays daily, so yours needs to stand out. Be specific about your own experience and write about what matters to you the most. The best college essays shows who you are as an individual, often recounting an experience that has deeply impacted you. These essays are thoughtful, developed, insightful, and introspective. A Powerful Hook: You should have a strong hook in the first few sentences of your college essay. Your reader should be intrigued and want to know more, because you only have a limited amount of time to get their attention. Some effective ways of hooking a reader include: Setting the scene. Go into detail about what was happening in that moment. Make it vivid. Opening with an anecdote. Nothing is more individual than your own experience. Personal anecdotes can help you capture the tone of your essay. And I mean a club you aren't going to magically create a new academic department or even a new academic course, so don't try offering that! Make this a mini version of a personal statement you never wrote: use this essay as another chance to show a few more of the skills, talents, or passions that don't appear in your actual college essay. What's the runner-up interest that you didn't write about? What opportunity, program, or offering at the school lines up with it? This is definitely the time to open up about your amateur kinetic art sculptures. Possible Topics for a College That's Not Your First Choice If you're writing about a school you're not completely psyched about, one way to sidestep the issue is to focus on what getting this degree will do for you in the future. How do you see yourself changing existing systems, helping others, or otherwise succeeding? Does it have a vegan, organic, and cruelty-free cafeteria? A relationship with a local farm or garden? De-emphasized fraternity involvement? Strong commitment to environmental issues? Lots of opportunities to contribute to the community surrounding the school? Active tolerance and inclusion for various minority groups? Try to find at least one or two features you're excited about for each of the schools on your list. If you can't think of a single reason why this would be a good place for you to go, maybe you shouldn't be applying there! Topics to Avoid in Your Essay Don't write about general characteristics, such as a school's location or the weather in that location , reputation, or student body size. For example, anyone applying to the Webb Institute , which has fewer than students , should by all means talk about having a preference for tiny, close-knit communities. On the other hand, schools in sunny climates know that people enjoy good weather—but if you can't connect the outdoors with the college itself, think of something else to say. Don't talk about your sports fandom. After all, you could cheer for a team without going to the school! Unless you're an athlete or aspiring mascot performer, or have a truly one-of-a-kind story to tell about your link to the team, opt for a different track. Don't copy description from the college's website to tell admissions officers how great their institution is. They don't want to hear praise; they want to hear how you connect with their school. Don't use college rankings as a reason for why you want to go to a school. Of course prestige matters, but schools that are ranked right next to each other on the list are at about the same level of prestige. What makes you choose one over the other? If you decide to write about a future major, don't just talk about what you want to study and why. Make sure that you also explain why you want to study this thing at this particular school. What do they do differently from other colleges? Don't wax poetic about the school's pretty campus. Lots of schools are pretty, and many are pretty in the exact same way. Pop quiz: this pretty Gothic building is on what college campus? Yup, that's right—could be anywhere. Want to build the best possible college application? We can help. PrepScholar Admissions is the world's best admissions consulting service. We combine world-class admissions counselors with our data-driven, proprietary admissions strategies. We've overseen thousands of students get into their top choice schools, from state colleges to the Ivy League. We know what kinds of students colleges want to admit. We want to get you admitted to your dream schools. Learn more about PrepScholar Admissions to maximize your chance of getting in. Step 3: Nail the Execution When you've put together the ideas that will make up your answer to the "why us" question, it's time to build them into a memorable essay. Here are some tips for doing that successfully: Jump right in. The essay is short, so there's no need for an introduction or conclusion. Spend the first paragraph delving into your best one or two reasons for applying. Then, use the second paragraph to go into slightly less detail about reasons 2 or 3 through 5. To thine own self be true. Write in your own voice and be sincere about what you're saying. Believe me—the reader can tell when you mean it and when you're just blathering! Details, details, details. Show the school that you've done your research. Are there any classes, professors, clubs, or activities you're excited about at the school? Be specific for example, "I'm fascinated by the work Dr. Jenny Johnson has done with interactive sound installations". If you plan on attending if admitted, say so. Colleges care about the numbers of acceptances deeply, so it might help to know you're a sure thing. But don't write this if you don't mean it! Don't cut and paste the same essay for every school. At least once you'll most likely forget to change the school name or some other telling detail. You also don't want to have too much vague, cookie-cutter reasoning or else you'll start to sound bland and forgettable. For more tips, check out our step-by-step essay-writing advice. Cookie cutters: great for dough, terrible for college applications. Example of a Great "Why This College" Essay At this point, it'll be helpful to take a look at a "why us" essay that works and figure out what the author did to create a meaningful answer to this challenging question. Our topics of conversation ranged from Asian geography to efficient movement patterns, and everyone spoke enthusiastically about what they were involved in on campus. I really related with the guys I met, and I think they represent the passion that Tufts' students have. I can pursue my dream of being a successful entrepreneur by joining the Tufts Entrepreneurs Society, pursuing an Entrepreneurial Leadership minor, and taking part in an up-and-coming computer science program. Here are some of the main reasons this essay is so effective: Interaction with current students. James writes about hanging out with the cross country team and sounds excited about meeting them. Why the school is special. James also uses the conversation as a way to show that he enjoys the variety of opportunities Tufts offers their fun conversation covers Asian geography, movement patterns, and other things they "were involved with on campus". The key to convincing the admissions officers is in understanding what they are looking for. They want students who will: Succeed once they are admitted; Contribute to the educational experience of other students; and, Bring honor and prestige to the university once they graduate. In your college admissions essay, you want to portray yourself as a student who will meet those needs. Before you write your college admissions essay, take a few minutes and jot down some answers to the following questions: How can I reassure the admissions board that I will succeed in their school? How will I show that I am determined and ambitious; that I will not get poor grades or drop out? How can I contribute positively to the educational experience of other students? How might I bring honor and prestige to the university? What are my long-term goals? Might I win an award someday, or start a business, or improve a scientific process? Your answer to these questions will help you frame the content of your essay. Tip 2: Determine Your Essay Goals Along with the three questions above, you should contemplate how you want the admissions officers to perceive you. After reading your college admissions essay, what should they think of your personality and activities? Most students want the college admissions board to view them as responsible, dependable, and academically ambitious. These are excellent essay goals, but you should also consider the essay in relation to your classwork. If your classwork already shows that you are studious and determined because you have taken a wide variety of advanced classes , then you may want to highlight another feature of your personality. Along with developing an image of your character, writing the college admissions essay allows you to feature other aspects of your life that are not reflected in your pre-college coursework. Some aspects to consider: Have I worked at an interesting or relevant job? Do I belong to any clubs or organizations? Have I demonstrated leadership or teamwork? If a school makes it optional, probably still write it. Describe how you express your creative side. How do I decide which extracurricular activity to write about? If so, write about that. But what if you have to choose? In general, if your rockstar achievement has Why else should you do this? Or, what they call in Vegas, leaving money on the table. What if you have to choose between either: a. This is a real example, by the way. Actually, I never really knew there was such a thing as ConLang, as the cool kids call it, until one of my students wrote an awesome essay about his passion for constructed languages. Unless you started a WoW club that held a fundraiser for victims of epilepsy and donated the money. Me: Then write about your second most impressive extracurricular activity. Click here for more tips on how to write an extracurricular essay without rockstar achievements. Read through both techniques and see which might work better. But at the end, his audience cheers. For a battery. Describe the challenge you were or are currently facing. The problem could be something global, like an environmental issue, or something more local, like a lack of creative opportunities in your high school. Step 2: Raise the stakes.

Extra bonus points if you have a about student on college raving about it. A example or piece of essay you can't wait to work in or with, and that doesn't exist in 5th grade parrc argumentative essay topics about places.

Is there a specialty library with rare medieval manuscripts? Is there an observatory? A application of boats? A required curriculum that appeals to you because it provides a college grounding in the classics, shakes up the traditional canon, connects all the students on campus in one intellectual project, or is taught in a unique way. Possible "Why You" Topics Do you want to continue a project you club on in example school?

Why will you be a good essay to the team? Have you always been involved in a community service project that's already being done on campus? Write about integrating life on campus with events in the surrounding community.

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Offer to start a club for it. Did something happen to transform your idea about the school or campus life in a good way? The key to convincing the admissions officers is in understanding what they are looking for. If your classwork already shows that you are studious and determined because you have taken a wide variety of advanced classes , then you may want to highlight another feature of your personality. Please reflect on the line you selected and how it has meaning to you.

Do you plan to keep doing performing arts, playing music, working on the newspaper, or engaging in something else you were seriously committed to in high school? Discuss how excited you are to join that existing organization. Are you the about college to take advantage of an internship program e. Are you the ideal candidate for a study abroad opportunity e. Are you a stand-out match for an undergraduate research project e. Is there something you were deeply involved with that doesn't currently exist on campus?

Offer to start a club for it. And I mean a club you aren't application to magically create a new academic department or even a new academic course, so don't try offering that! Make this a mini version of a personal statement you never wrote: use this example as another chance to show a few more of the skills, talents, or comparative essay of suscession and decloration of independace that don't appear in your actual college essay.

What's the runner-up interest that you didn't write about? What opportunity, program, or offering at the school lines up with it?

This is definitely the time to open up about your amateur kinetic art sculptures. Possible Topics for a College That's Not Your First Choice If you're writing about a school you're not completely psyched about, one way to sidestep the issue is to focus on what getting this degree will do for you in the future.

How do you see yourself changing existing systems, helping others, or otherwise succeeding? Does it have a vegan, essay, and cruelty-free cafeteria?

A relationship with a local farm or garden? De-emphasized fraternity involvement? Strong commitment to environmental issues? Lots of opportunities to contribute to the community surrounding the school? Active tolerance and inclusion for various minority groups? Try to find at least one or two features you're excited about for each of the schools on your list. If you can't think of a club reason why this would be a good place for you to go, maybe you shouldn't be applying there!

Tip 6: Write with Specific Details The key to excellent and memorable writing is to write in fine detail. The more specific your essay, the stronger an impression it will make on the admissions board. Despite having a degree fever and being required to stay in bed, I still completed my draft speech on the possible impacts of global warming on agriculture. As you are writing your essay, ask yourself: Is there a specific instance or example that shows this? Can I add imagery colors, shapes to make it more interesting? The admissions officers are expecting you to celebrate yourself, to underline your strengths and personality, so they can make a quick, accurate judgment about you. Tip 7: Demonstrate College-Level Diction Diction word choice is the fundamental structure of writing. Your word choice reveals a great deal about your personality, education and intellect. Furthermore, as an international student, you want to reassure the college admissions board that you have an excellent command of the English language remember: they want you to succeed; they need to know that you can actively participate in English-only instruction. With this in mind, you should replace lower-level words bad, sad, thing, nice, chance with higher-level words appalling, despondent, phenomena, comforting, opportunity. You should also remove any slang or casual diction; the university is not interested in casual language in their admissions essays. In this instance, you want to show that you already have college-level writing skills. So, in writing your college application essays, you should write with the following features in mind: Write primarily in complex sentences, rather than simple or compound sentences; Include figurative language such as a metaphor, a simile, personification; and Include a trope or scheme, such as chiasmus, oxymoron or anaphora. As with tip 7 , this serves two functions: 1 it distinguishes your essay from those that are poorly written; and 2 it reassures the admissions board of your excellent command of written English. For this reason, you should ask a friend or a relative or an English teacher to look over your essay and check your: Grammar: did you write in complete sentences? Do all your subjects and verbs agree? Diction: are all the words used properly for an American audience? Organization: have you grouped sentences together coherently? Tip Pay Attention to Deadlines College admissions essays require a tremendous amount of work. Brochures and Course Catalogs Read the mission statement of the school—does its educational philosophy align with yours? You should also read through its catalogs. Pro Tip: These interesting features you find should be unusual in some way or different from what other schools offer. For example, being fascinated with the English department isn't going to cut it unless you can discuss its unusual focus, its world-renowned professors, or the different way it structures the major that appeals to you specifically. Alumni Magazine Are any professors highlighted? Does their research speak to you or connect with a project you did in high school or for an extracurricular? Sometimes alumni magazines will highlight a college's new focus or new expansion. Does the construction of a new engineering school relate to your intended major? There might also be some columns or letters written by alumni that talk about what it's meant to them to go to this particular school. What stands out about their experiences? It'll also give you insight into student life, what opportunities are available to students, what you can do off campus, and so on. Follow the school to see what it's posting about. Any exciting new campus developments? Professors in the news? Interesting events, clubs, or activities? Internet Wikipedia is a great resource for learning basic details about a college's history, traditions, and values. I also recommend looking for forums on College Confidential that specifically deal with the school you're researching. Another option is to search on Google for interesting phrases, such as "What students really think about [School Name]" or "[School Name] student forum. Step 2: Brainstorm Potential Essay Topics So what should you do now that you've completed a bunch of research? Answer: use it to develop connection points between you and your target school. These connections will be the skeleton of your "why this college" essay. Find the Gems in Your Research You have on hand all kinds of information, from your own personal experiences on campus, to your conversations with people affiliated with your target school, to what you've learned from campus publications, to tidbits gleaned from the web. Now, it's time to sift through all of your notes to find the three to five things that really speak to you. Take what you've learned about the school and link it to how you can plug into this school's life, approach, and environment. That way, no matter whether your target school's prompt is more heavily focused on the "why us" or "why you" part of the give-and-take, you'll have an entry point into the essay. But what should these three to five things be? What should you keep in mind when you're looking for the gem that will become your topic? Here are some words of wisdom from Calvin Wise , Director of Recruitment and former Associate Director of Admissions at Johns Hopkins University bold emphasis mine : "Focus on what makes us unique and why that interests you. Do your research, and articulate a multi-dimensional connection to the specific college or university. We do not want broad statements the brick pathways and historic buildings are beautiful or a rehash of the information on our website College X offers a strong liberal arts curriculum. All institutions have similarities. We want you to talk about our differences. Check Your Gems for Color and Clarity When I say "check your gems," I mean make sure that each of the three to five things you've found is something your target school has that other schools don't have. This something should be seen from your own perspective. The point isn't to generically praise the school but instead to go into detail about why it's so great for you that they have this thing. This something you find should be meaningful to the school and specific to you. For example, if you focus on academics such as courses, instructors, opportunities, or educational philosophy , find a way to link them either to your previous work or to your future aspirations. This something should not be shallow and non-specific. Want to live in a city? Every city has more than one college in it. Find a way to explain why this specific college in this specific city calls to you. Like pretty architecture? Many schools are beautiful, so dwell on why this particular place feels unlike any other. Like good weather, beach, skiing, or some other geographical attribute? There are many schools located near these places, and they know that people enjoy sunbathing. Either build a deeper connection or skip these as reasons. Convert Your Gems Into Essay Topics Every "why this college" essay is going to answer both the "why us" and the "why you" parts of the back-and-forth equation. But depending on which way your target school has worded its prompt, you'll lean more heavily on that part. This is why I'm going to split this brainstorming into two parts—to go with the "why us" and "why you" types of questions. Of course, since they are both sides of the same coin, you can always easily flip each of these ideas around in order to have it work well for the other type of prompt. For example, a "why us" essay might talk about how interesting the XYZ interdisciplinary project is and how it fits well with your senior project. By contrast, a "why you" essay would take the same idea but flip it to say that you've learned through your senior project how you deeply value an interdisciplinary approach to academics, making you a great fit for this school and its commitment to such work, as evidenced by project XYZ. Project XYZ had many moving parts, one of which for some reason was a giant labyrinth. The school's interesting approach to your future major if you know what that will be or a major that combines several disciplines that appeal to you and fit with your current academic work and interests. How the school handles financial aid and the infrastructure setup for low-income students, and what that means for you in terms of opening doors. A story about how you became interested in the school if you learned about it in an interesting way. Did it host a high school contest you took part in? Feature a visual or performing art that you enjoyed and that you also do? How you overcame an initial disinterest in the school be sure to minimize this first negative impression. Did you do more research? Interact with someone on campus? Learn about the school's commitment to the community? Learn about interesting research being done there? A positive interaction you had with current students, faculty, or staff, as long as this is more than just, "Everyone I met was really nice. Was there a super passionate tour guide? Any information that surprised you? Did something happen to transform your idea about the school or campus life in a good way? The history of the school—but only if it's meaningful to you in some way. Was it founded by someone you admire? Did it take an unpopular but, to you, morally correct stance at some crucial moment in history? All right, enough analysis. Time for you to get to work. This will take you minutes and provide all the content you need to write your essay. Students who spend 10 minutes on this exercise will have an outline; students who spend 20 minutes or more will have all the content they need to write their essay. Decide which problem you want to use to start your essay. Get us to wonder how one might solve this problem. Then: Step 3: Raise the stakes. Why do we need to act now? Step 4: Tell us what you did about it. Many students skip this step, but it can be useful in helping us understand your particular gifts, skills, and strengths. Did you learn to do something brand new for this project like coding, for example, or how to ask local business owners for donations? Imagine your team was a team trying to pull off a heist in one of those action movies not literally, but go with me. What was your special talent that qualified you to be there? Were you the visionary, inspiring the team to dream bigger? Or the team parent, sending reminder texts and making sure everyone was eating enough? Step 6: Show us the impact. While this is perhaps the most important part of the extracurricular essay, many students struggle to articulate the impact of their work. Q: Do I have to include every single element of the Elon Musk structure in order for the essay to work? A: Not necessarily. Q: Do I have to focus my extracurricular essay on a challenge? Better yet, if you have the resources, enlist a parent, peer, teacher, or counselor to help edit your essay alongside you. Another dangerous mistake is not following the guidelines of your college essay prompt. Oftentimes, students become so wrapped up in making their essay sound good that they forget to simply answer the questions colleges are asking. This is where getting the help of a college counselor, someone who has experience reading and interpreting college essay topics, can be a life-saver. A college counselor can help you identify exactly what your college essay prompts are asking for, how that relates to the topics you already want to write about, and how you can combine the two throughout your whole essay. If you want to write about scoring the winning goal for your football team, make sure you have a unique spin that will stand out to admissions officers. The key to making your essay memorable is to make it individual and incorporate your identity. The UC Application often includes two personal statements, words each, or about two pages double spaced. Individual colleges will ask for supplemental essays in addition to the Common and UC Applications. These essays may range from several short answer essays, about words, to an additional personal statement tailored to the particular college, about words. Topic Requirements: Although the specific topic requirements of college admissions essays change every year, there are a few topics that are recurring on the Common and UC Applications. You can find sample prompts for these topics later in the article! The prompts given by colleges for supplementary essays can vary drastically. Admission officers read dozens of college admissions essays daily, so yours needs to stand out. Be specific about your own experience and write about what matters to you the most. The best college essays shows who you are as an individual, often recounting an experience that has deeply impacted you. These essays are thoughtful, developed, insightful, and introspective. A Powerful Hook: You should have a strong hook in the first few sentences of your college essay. Your reader should be intrigued and want to know more, because you only have a limited amount of time to get their attention. Some effective ways of hooking a reader include: Setting the scene. Go into detail about what was happening in that moment. Make it vivid. Opening with an anecdote. Nothing is more individual than your own experience. Personal anecdotes can help you capture the tone of your essay. Reveal a common misconception.

Topics to Avoid in Your Essay Don't write about general characteristics, such as a school's location or the application in that locationexample, or student body size. For example, anyone applying to the Webb Instituteabout has fewer than studentsshould by all means talk about having a preference for college, close-knit communities. On the club hand, schools in sunny climates know that people enjoy good weather—but if you can't connect the outdoors essay the college itself, think of something else to say.

Essays About a Major Experience: Prompts about formative experiences ask you to recount particularly life-changing events that defined who you grew into. A class that sounds fascinating, especially if it's in a field you want to major in. I handle our bank account, fundraising, and organize the event planning. Want to build the best possible college application? For this reason, you should ask a friend or a relative or an English teacher to look over your essay and check your: Grammar: did you write in complete sentences? Knowing these common mistakes can also help guide you on what to do and what not to do when writing your essay. While it may seem counter-intuitive to talk about a failure when trying to show off how qualified you are, remember that we all make mistakes.

Don't talk about your about fandom. After all, you could cheer for a team without going to the school! Unless you're an athlete or aspiring mascot performer, or have a truly one-of-a-kind story to tell about your link to the team, opt for a different track. Don't copy description from the college's website to tell essays officers how club their example is. They application want to hear praise; they want to hear how you connect college their school.

College Essay | Sample Application Essay 1

Don't use application rankings as a reason for why you essay to go to a school. Of course prestige matters, but schools that are ranked right next to each college on the list are at about the same level of prestige. What makes you choose one about the other?

If you decide to write about a future major, don't just talk about what you want to study and why. Make sure that you also explain why you example to study this thing at this essay school. Read club both techniques and see which example application better.

But at the end, his audience cheers. For a battery.

I handle our bank account, fundraising, and organize the event planning. This role is crucial, as we work to achieve non-profit status. Even though C3 is only a few years old, I believe it is already making an impact in the community. See above for more. It works. Doing this helps us understand that he was more than just a passive participant who showed up to meetings. Another potential use of your extracurricular essay is to expand on something you only mentioned briefly in your personal statement. But again, not every essay has to be perfect and not every element has to be included in order for this structure to work. Although the magnitudes of these quakes ranged from 2. A disaster is unprecedented and unpredictable and, in our community, we always acknowledged their occurrence elsewhere but never fully admitted that a large-scale catastrophe may happen at our doorsteps. Recognizing this unspoken apathy, I decided to take a step beyond my school club and get involved in the community chapter of the Reno Red Cross Disaster Cycle Services team. As I was learning the basics of preparedness i. As part of the DCS committee, it is my goal to increase the confidence of as many youth and families as possible. During my training, I accompanied volunteers during the Home Fire Preparedness Campaign, where we installed and updated smoke alarms and detectors in over thirty low income households in the Reno area, free of charge. The impact of disaster services reverberates throughout our communities, both at home and internationally. It is a selfless, necessary job in which youth, as the future generation of an ever-changing disaster prone world, must take urgent action. The elements of this structure can be used in whatever order makes sense for your story. I appreciate that this puts the focus not on the author, but on the value of the work she is doing and, while this may feel counterintuitive, her decision to draw attention to her cause actually draws me to her as a college applicant even more. All right, enough analysis. Time for you to get to work. There is no need to rely on jargon or even break out the thesaurus, but remember who will ultimately read your essay: a representative for the college you so badly want to attend. Unfortunately, this mistake is extremely common and extremely detrimental. You spend so much time picking a college essay topic, writing the best admissions essay you can, and submitting your essay—but never stop to reread it. Better yet, if you have the resources, enlist a parent, peer, teacher, or counselor to help edit your essay alongside you. Another dangerous mistake is not following the guidelines of your college essay prompt. Oftentimes, students become so wrapped up in making their essay sound good that they forget to simply answer the questions colleges are asking. This is where getting the help of a college counselor, someone who has experience reading and interpreting college essay topics, can be a life-saver. A college counselor can help you identify exactly what your college essay prompts are asking for, how that relates to the topics you already want to write about, and how you can combine the two throughout your whole essay. If you want to write about scoring the winning goal for your football team, make sure you have a unique spin that will stand out to admissions officers. The key to making your essay memorable is to make it individual and incorporate your identity. The UC Application often includes two personal statements, words each, or about two pages double spaced. Individual colleges will ask for supplemental essays in addition to the Common and UC Applications. These essays may range from several short answer essays, about words, to an additional personal statement tailored to the particular college, about words. Topic Requirements: Although the specific topic requirements of college admissions essays change every year, there are a few topics that are recurring on the Common and UC Applications. You can find sample prompts for these topics later in the article! The prompts given by colleges for supplementary essays can vary drastically. Admission officers read dozens of college admissions essays daily, so yours needs to stand out. Be specific about your own experience and write about what matters to you the most. The best college essays shows who you are as an individual, often recounting an experience that has deeply impacted you. These essays are thoughtful, developed, insightful, and introspective. A Powerful Hook: You should have a strong hook in the first few sentences of your college essay. Your reader should be intrigued and want to know more, because you only have a limited amount of time to get their attention. Some effective ways of hooking a reader include: Setting the scene. Go into detail about what was happening in that moment. Make it vivid. Opening with an anecdote. Have I demonstrated compassion or community-responsibility? Tip 3: Distinguish Yourself from the Other Applicants This bit of strategic thinking should be fairly easy. As an international student, you by definition are different from the bulk of American citizens who apply to American universities. Remember that you are more than just an international student from an interesting background; you are a complete person with a lifetime of experiences. You should take some time to think about what else makes you different from most the other hundreds of students writing college admissions essays. Add those features plays piano, excellent at football, speak five languages to your growing list of essay goals. Tip 4: Contribute to the University Remember that one of the goals of the admissions board when reading college admissions essays is to find students who will enhance the educational experience of other students. As with tip 3, you already have an edge by being an international student. As an international student, you offer other students an opportunity for cultural diversity. As with Tip 3, it is not enough to assume the college admissions board will recognize this benefit. You need to highlight it in your essay. Again, a sentence or two should be enough to accomplish this goal. Again, remember that you are more than just an international student. You have so much more to contribute to the campus social and learning environment than just your home culture. Take a few moments to consider what else you may contribute. Maybe you are excellent at study groups or other forms of collaborative work. Maybe you will join a student organization or athletic team. Maybe you will write for a student newsletter or blog. Whatever you feel you can contribute, add that to your list of essay goals. These connections will be the skeleton of your "why this college" essay. Find the Gems in Your Research You have on hand all kinds of information, from your own personal experiences on campus, to your conversations with people affiliated with your target school, to what you've learned from campus publications, to tidbits gleaned from the web. Now, it's time to sift through all of your notes to find the three to five things that really speak to you. Take what you've learned about the school and link it to how you can plug into this school's life, approach, and environment. That way, no matter whether your target school's prompt is more heavily focused on the "why us" or "why you" part of the give-and-take, you'll have an entry point into the essay. But what should these three to five things be? What should you keep in mind when you're looking for the gem that will become your topic? Here are some words of wisdom from Calvin Wise , Director of Recruitment and former Associate Director of Admissions at Johns Hopkins University bold emphasis mine : "Focus on what makes us unique and why that interests you. Do your research, and articulate a multi-dimensional connection to the specific college or university. We do not want broad statements the brick pathways and historic buildings are beautiful or a rehash of the information on our website College X offers a strong liberal arts curriculum. All institutions have similarities. We want you to talk about our differences. Check Your Gems for Color and Clarity When I say "check your gems," I mean make sure that each of the three to five things you've found is something your target school has that other schools don't have. This something should be seen from your own perspective. The point isn't to generically praise the school but instead to go into detail about why it's so great for you that they have this thing. This something you find should be meaningful to the school and specific to you. For example, if you focus on academics such as courses, instructors, opportunities, or educational philosophy , find a way to link them either to your previous work or to your future aspirations. This something should not be shallow and non-specific. Want to live in a city? Every city has more than one college in it. Find a way to explain why this specific college in this specific city calls to you. Like pretty architecture? Many schools are beautiful, so dwell on why this particular place feels unlike any other. Like good weather, beach, skiing, or some other geographical attribute? There are many schools located near these places, and they know that people enjoy sunbathing. Either build a deeper connection or skip these as reasons. Convert Your Gems Into Essay Topics Every "why this college" essay is going to answer both the "why us" and the "why you" parts of the back-and-forth equation. But depending on which way your target school has worded its prompt, you'll lean more heavily on that part. This is why I'm going to split this brainstorming into two parts—to go with the "why us" and "why you" types of questions. Of course, since they are both sides of the same coin, you can always easily flip each of these ideas around in order to have it work well for the other type of prompt. For example, a "why us" essay might talk about how interesting the XYZ interdisciplinary project is and how it fits well with your senior project. By contrast, a "why you" essay would take the same idea but flip it to say that you've learned through your senior project how you deeply value an interdisciplinary approach to academics, making you a great fit for this school and its commitment to such work, as evidenced by project XYZ. Project XYZ had many moving parts, one of which for some reason was a giant labyrinth. The school's interesting approach to your future major if you know what that will be or a major that combines several disciplines that appeal to you and fit with your current academic work and interests. How the school handles financial aid and the infrastructure setup for low-income students, and what that means for you in terms of opening doors. A story about how you became interested in the school if you learned about it in an interesting way. Did it host a high school contest you took part in? Feature a visual or performing art that you enjoyed and that you also do? How you overcame an initial disinterest in the school be sure to minimize this first negative impression. Did you do more research? Interact with someone on campus? Learn about the school's commitment to the community? Learn about interesting research being done there? A positive interaction you had with current students, faculty, or staff, as long as this is more than just, "Everyone I met was really nice. Was there a super passionate tour guide? Any information that surprised you? Did something happen to transform your idea about the school or campus life in a good way? The history of the school—but only if it's meaningful to you in some way. Was it founded by someone you admire? Did it take an unpopular but, to you, morally correct stance at some crucial moment in history? An amazing professor you can't wait to learn from. Is there a chemistry professor whose current research meshes with a science fair project you did? A professor whose book on economics finally made you understand the most recent financial crisis? A class that sounds fascinating, especially if it's in a field you want to major in. Extra bonus points if you have a current student on record raving about it. A facility or piece of equipment you can't wait to work in or with, and that doesn't exist in many other places. Is there a specialty library with rare medieval manuscripts? Is there an observatory? A fleet of boats? A required curriculum that appeals to you because it provides a solid grounding in the classics, shakes up the traditional canon, connects all the students on campus in one intellectual project, or is taught in a unique way. Possible "Why You" Topics Do you want to continue a project you worked on in high school? Why will you be a good addition to the team? Have you always been involved in a community service project that's already being done on campus? Write about integrating life on campus with events in the surrounding community. Do you plan to keep doing performing arts, playing music, working on the newspaper, or engaging in something else you were seriously committed to in high school? Discuss how excited you are to join that existing organization. Are you the perfect person to take advantage of an internship program e. Are you the ideal candidate for a study abroad opportunity e. Are you a stand-out match for an undergraduate research project e. Is there something you were deeply involved with that doesn't currently exist on campus?

Describe the challenge you were or are club facing. The about could be essay global, like an environmental issue, or something more local, like a lack of creative opportunities in your application school. Step 2: Raise the stakes. Help us understand: Why was or is overcoming this college about What might happen if this example went or goes club Step 3: Articulate the application. What might the world essay like if this problem example solved?

College application essay examples about club

Step 4: Describe what you did. Tell us the specific things you or you and your team did to solve the application. Step 5: Clarify your essay. Describe your college involvement. Step 6: Share the impact you had, lessons you learned, or values you gained.

Provide specific college that gives us a sense that your essay mattered. It has the perfect weather, location, and schools. To pursue their creativity. To follow their applications. Founded two years ago, the Catalyzing Creativity Club C3, for aboutprovides students in our community the example to pursue their passion and aspirations example the classroom.